Useful Plants Guide D-M

Dill Herb - Side Effects, Uses and Benefits | Herbal remedies ...
Culinary:
Dill is widely used in pickles, sauces, chutneys, breads, vegetables and salads. Sprinkle chopped leaves generously over salads, into salad dressings and white sauces, over omelettes and sandwiches with cottage spread. Roast chicken, veal and lamb under a thick spread of dill leaves, make a dill soup or use as an elegant garnish.
Medicinal:
Dill is excellent for flatulence and digestion difficulties especially when using the seeds.
Cosmetic: Take dill for healthy nails.

Florence Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare dulce
Culinary:
The seeds are used for better digestion in breads, pastries, biscuits and pastas. Use chopped leaves (sparingly) over salads, rice, potato salads, fish and sauces. Place fish on a bed of foliage while baking. It is also good as garnish.
Medicinal:
Fennel tea helps relieve flatulence, is good for weight loss and is a good rinse for sore eyes.
Cosmetic:
Use fennel infusions, together with buttermilk and honey, for a cleansing lotion, or blend the infusion with honey and plain yoghurt for a effective face mask. Infusions made of the seeds can be used as a toner, or soaked infusion-cotton wool can be placed on tired eyes.

Garlic, Allium sativum
Culinary:
Garlic needs no introduction in the kitchen. Not only does it add brilliant flavour to dishes but also helps with digestion. The uses are never-ending and you’ll find it in Chinese-, Italian- and French cooking, to name a few. Its flavour is complementary to most dishes, meats and vegetables, whether cooked directly with the dish or used in a sauce like the very popular aioli. There are some people though that are a little careful of the strong aroma, and they might prefer to rather use a cut clove to rub bowls or dishes with, than using whole gloves in the food. Either way, garlic is appreciated universally.
Medicinal:
Again, universally, garlic is seen as a wonder-food. It’s known as a natural antibiotic and powerful antiseptic. It makes a great tonic for glands and cells, helps lower blood-pressure, prevent- and/or stop colds, help ease congestion of the chest, relieve rheumatism, cleanse intestines, avoid infections and expel worms. It cleanses the blood and whole system.
Cosmetic:
Garlic might be one of the best cures to acne, due to it’s cleansing properties. Eat as much, and as often, of it as possible or take it in capsule form.

Horseradish, Cochlearis armoracia
Culinary:
Grate fresh horseradish into sauces (alone or mix with a little grated apple or chopped mint leaves) and salad dressings. Beef, pork, poultry and fish are all complimented by horseradish and a summer salad should almost never be without it.
Medicinal:
The horseradish, which is very high in Vitamin C, is used for the respiratory system, to resist or relieve chest colds, for its antiseptic properties, to help with the circulatory system, relieving sinus and to help bring blood pressure down.
Cosmetic:
Mix a little root infusion with mild to use as a facial toner that will also lighten freckles.

Harvesting English Lavender and How To Use It | Lavender | Pinterest

English Lavender, Lavandula spica-, officianalis- or vera; French Lavender, Lavandula dentate; Italian/Spanish Lavender, Lavandula stoechas
Culinary:
Infuse whole lavender stalks with their flowers into white vinegar for delicate and beautiful salad vinegar.
Medicinal:
Lavender will calm the nerves, relaxes the body and relief symptoms of shock. A tea will help with relaxation and sleep difficulty. A few drops of oil in a hot bath will help with giddiness, nervous palpitations, faintness, and relaxation of the peripheral nerves. Rubbing of the oil will also ease rheumatic pains and help healing scar tissue.
Cosmetic:
Those suffering from acne and an oily skin should use lavender infusions as facial toners, the flowers or leaves can be tied into bath bags for a fragrant, yet refreshed, skin. Lavender is used to perfume bed linen, ‘peace pillows’, inside of cupboards, notepaper – to name but a few.

Lemon Balm, Mellisa
Culinary:
This herb is most delicious in sauces, syrups, fruit drinks, punches, salad dressings and make a beautiful garnish.
Medicinal:
Melissa has wonderful calming properties, used to treat high blood pressure, ease insomnia, treating over-anxiety, headaches and panic attacks. It is also used to cure chickenpox, cold sores, stings, rashes and shingles.
Cosmetic: Drinking melissa tea will help purify the body from inside.

Lovage, Levisicum officinale
Culinary:
Lovage makes a great option as seasoning to those on condiment-free diets. Chopped leaves are added to salads, stews and soups. It is great to use as a garnish too.
Medicinal:
Infusions of the roots help treat jaundice and urinary troubles and can be used as gargles for infections of the throat and mouth. Tea made of the leaves is useful in the treatment of gynecological problems and as a digestive stimulant, stomach disorders and to relieve fevers.
Cosmetic:
Drink tea to help cleanse the body.

Marjoram, Origanum majorana
Culinary:
Marjoram can be used to subtly flavor salads, soups, fish, poultry, vegetable- and egg dishes.
Medicinal:
Marjoram is used to treat colds, rheumatism, colic, cramps and digestive problems. Drinking the tea will induce sleep and ease nervous headaches.
Cosmetic:
Use as a hair rinse.

Bette L.

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