Useful Plants Guide A-B-C

Some of our favorite tips and tricks come from users themselves …

Angelica, Angelica archangelica
Culinary:
Cook and eat the Angelica roots as a vegetable.
Use a few young leaves in salads for extra flavour.
Medicinal:
Angelica is used in cases of infection, indigestion and flatulence. Teas can be made to calm the nerves.
Note: Not suitable to diabetics.
Cosmetic:
Use the leaves, dried or fresh, bagged in muslin for hot baths to calm nerves, relax and for fragrance.

Anise, Pimpinella anisum
Culinary:
Stewed fruits, vegetables, breads, pasta and cakes can be flavoured by Anise, which will also help with digestion. Add to salads, soups and rich dishes.
Medicinal:
Aniseed helps respiratory ailments and indigestion. A tea can be made to prevent and combat colds, influenza and flatulence.
Cosmetic: Use Anise oil as an antiseptic.

Balm, Melissa Officinalis
Culinary:
Use Balm as a seasoning to pork, lamb, chicken and fish., fruit- and vegetable salads and stewed fruit.
Medicinal:
Fevers, memory loss, headaches, neuralgia, appetite loss and digestion are treated with tea made of Balm leaves.
Cosmetic: Balm infusions help cleanse and perfumes the skin.

Basil, Ocimum basilicum
Culinary:
Basil is widely used in dishes ranging from soups to pastas. Basil and tomatoes make an excellent combination as we know, but try other vegetables too! Veal, liver, kidneys, fish and poultry also goes well with basil. Use with cream cheese in sandwiches for a refreshing summer lunch.
Medicinal:
Tea of basil can be drunk in cases of bladder-, lung-, kidney-, heart- and brain disease. It is known to relieve morning- and car sickness and headaches.
Cosmetic:
Basil oil is used as a tonic on the skin.

Bay Tree, Laurus nobilis
Culinary:
Flavour soups, casseroles or stews with savoury herb posies, consisting of bay-, marjoram-, thyme- and parsley leaves during cooking and remove before serving. Bay leaves add beautiful flavour to fish, meat and poultry.
Medicinal:
Bay oil can be used on earache, sprains, rheumatism, hysteria and flatulence.
Cosmetic:
Use with other soothing herbs in peace pillows to relieve insomnia.

Bergamot, Monarda didyma
Culinary:
The leaves of Bergamot are used beautifully in all summery dishes. Try adding it to vegetable-, pork- and veal dishes. Use in salads, sweet jellies and hot- or cold beverages. Tear the red to pink flowers apart and toss into salads.
Medicinal:
Treat colds, chest problems and sore throats with tea made from bergamot leaves.
Cosmetic:
Bergamot in a hot bath soothes aching bones and tired minds.

Borage, Borago officinalis
Culinary:
Chop borage leaves finely and scatter together with the beautiful flowers over salads. Use also in soups, again finely chopped.
Medicinal:
Borage tea is drunk to aid good blood circulation, as a remedy to heart problems and a tonic to urinary tract and adrenal glands. It is also known to reduce fevers.
Cosmetic: Use the leaves and flowers when doing a facial steam, or try a face pack of young leaves for dry skins.

Caraway, Carum carvi
Culinary:
Sprinkles the seeds over potato- or onion dishes, various vegetables and baking fruit. Use in homemade breads, biscuits and cakes. Try the leaves in soups and salads.
Medicinal:
The kidneys benefit greatly by the intake of Caraway, through the leaves, the seeds and also the root.
Cosmetic:
Drink teas made from Caraway to cleanse from the inside and get a clear complexion.

English Chamomile, Anthenis nobilis; German Chamomile, Matricaria chamomile
Culinary:
Chamomile is lovely in summer used in salads and cold beverages of water, lemon-juice and honey.
Medicinal:
Chamomile tea is used as a great remedy to tension, nervous problems, pms as it helps to calm and relax. Chamomile flowers added to sleeping pillows will bring on deep relaxation and eventually sleep. Infusions used to bath in reduce muscle pains and fatigue. Treat eye sty’s by bathing it frequently with cooled and strained chamomile tea.
Cosmetic:
Use the chamomile for facial steams and masks, lotions, soaps and after-sun creams. A hair rinse made of cooled chamomile tea is used to lighten hair.

Chervil, Anthriscus cerefolium
Culinary:
Chervil is used widely in dishes as flavour and/or garnish. Use finely chopped leaves with poultry and fish, vegetables, omelettes, soups and sauces – but never cook longer than 15 minutes or the flavour will be lost. Sprinkle over salads or sandwich fillings.
Medicinal: Eat chervil to clean the blood, ease rheumatism and aid the kidneys.
Cosmetic: Eat or drink to clean from the inside.

Chicory, Cichorum intybus
Culinary:
Toss some young leaves into salads or cook as a vegetable. The roots undergo a treatment to produce coffee substitutes and coffee additives.
Medicinal:
Chicory helps relieve constipation and is helpful to those suffering from bilious attacks and liver- and gal problems. It also, due to high insulin concentrations, acts as a sedative and tonic.
Note: Not suitable for those anaemic.
Cosmetic:
Used from the inside to help improve liver functions, it will help with a clear complexion.

Chives, Allium schoenoprasum
Culinary:
Chives are an excellent replacement to onions and/or garlic in cases where a subtler flavour and better digestion is needed. Therefore onion chives can be used as widely as both the onion and garlic in all kinds of dishes, salads and vegetables. Excellently used as a flavouring garnish.
Note: Never cook too long, for the flavour will be lost.
Medicinal:
Chives helps lower high blood pressure, acts as a kidney tonic and an appetite stimulant.
Cosmetic:
Chives eaten regularly will help with beautiful, strong nails, teeth and hair.

Comfrey, Symphytum officinale
Culinary:
Comfrey leaves can be eaten as a vegetable, much like spinach. Steam young leaves and sprinkle a little cheese over, add to salads or use as greenery on sandwiches.
Medicinal:
Comfrey infusions are used as a remedy to colds, insufficient circulation and to help with mending of broken bones. The roots and foliage are also used for sprains, bruises and wounds. Tea can be drunk to help clean the blood.
Cosmetic:
Used in facial steams or in creams to aid ageing, tired or dry skins.

Coriander, Coriandrum sativum
Culinary:
Ground Coriander seeds are used in curry- and spice blends, baked fruits, to flavor fish, meat and poultry and when pickling.
Medicinal:
A snuff made from crushed seeds relieves dizziness. Coriander teas are used to relieve urinary problems, to ease colic and for purifying blood.
Cosmetic:
By cleansing the body from within will clear complexions.

Bette L.

Hi, I am Bette L. If you’re looking for an expert on gardening, or a Guru on vertical gardening, then I’m NOT the right person.I thought that if I was able to build an affordable Vertical Garden, everyone would be able to do the same.

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